April 2015 Club Meeting - "Amateur Satellites"

April 17, 2015 

7:00pm MST

Ascension Lutheran Church 1220 West Magee Road, Tucson, AZ

Handyman Corner

Presented by Tom, W8TK

TBD

Doctor DX

Presented by George, NG7A

TBD

Amateur Satellites

Presented by Patrick Stoddard, WD9EWK

AMSAT

Patrick’s presentation will be about amateur satellites - a brief history, discussion of current satellites, and upcoming satellites (AMSAT's Fox-1 project, in particular). A demonstration may be possible, depending on what satellites are passing by on the meeting night.

 

 About Patrick Stoddard, WD9EWK

StoddardPatrick Stoddard WD9EWK/VA7EWK is the Director of Field Operations and an Area Coordinator for AMSAT. Between 2011 and 2013, Patrick was an alternate member of AMSAT's Board of Directors. After many years trying different aspects of amateur radio, Patrick began working amateur satellites in 2005. Since then, he has worked stations in all 50 US states and 20 other countries from Arizona. Patrick has worked satellites from locations in all 15 Arizona counties, 17 other US states plus Washington DC, and 3 other countries (Canada, Mexico, Australia). 

Patrick obtained his initial amateur radio license in 1977, and now holds the top classes of license in the USA (Amateur Extra) and Canada (Basic, Advanced, and Morse qualifications). Although mostly active on satellites, he enjoys working HF, 6m, and other bands and modes.

Professionally, Patrick is an I.T. systems administrator for an insurance company in the Phoenix area, with 20 years experience in the I.T. field.

March 2015 Club Meeting - "WWV for Amateur Radio"

March 20, 2015 

7:00pm MST

Ascension Lutheran Church 1220 West Magee Road, Tucson, AZ

Handyman Corner

Presented by Tom, W8TK

"Make a Cable Winder" 

Doctor DX

Presented by George, NG7A

The DeciBel
 

WWV for Amateur Radio

Presented by Tom Kravec, W8TK

WWV Buildings

WWV and WWVB radio stations are located in Fort Collins, Colorado.  They are operated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, a division of the U. S. Department of Commerce.  NIST provides time and frequency standards to the world. It’s easy to see that the world depends heavily on time and frequency information, and that we rely on many millions of clocks and oscillators to keep time and produce frequency. To keep the world running smoothly, these devices need to be periodically compared to an internationally recognized standard. This comparison might be as simple as setting our watch or alarm clock to the correct minute, or adjusting the frequency of an atomic oscillator so it keeps time within a few nanoseconds per day. The time and fre- quency standards maintained by NIST provide the reference for these comparisons.  The task of maintaining the national standards for time and frequency is an important part of the work done at NIST, and it fits in perfectly with the agency’s mission. NIST serves as the national measurement laboratory, or the ultimate reference point for measurements made in the United States. NIST is responsible for maintaining the seven base physical quantities at the highest possible accuracies. Time is one of the seven base quantities; the others are used in the measurement of length, light, electricity, chemical concentration, temperature, and mass. NIST distributes the standard units of measurement throughout the country in the form of measurement services and standard reference materials. By doing so, it provides measurement references to anyone who needs them.  In addition, the radio stations provide up-to-the-minute updates on geophysical alerts, marine storm warnings, and GPS status announcements.  W8TK’s presentation will detail all of the information available on WWV broadcasts, illustrated with audio clips taken from his receiver in his Tucson hamshack.

About Tom Kravec, W8TK

Tom is an experienced ham who has a passion for helping new hams become comfortable with their new hobby.  He is a regular speaker at OVARC meetings presenting the Handyman Corner.  Tom is also the OVARC Field Day Chairman and Chief Elmer.  

February 2015 Club Meeting - "Digital Mobile Radio (DMR) – The Basics"

February 20, 2015 

7:00pm MST

Ascension Lutheran Church 1220 West Magee Road, Tucson, AZ

Handyman Corner

Presented by Tom, W8TK

TBA 

Doctor DX

Presented by George, NG7A

TBA

Digital Mobile Radio (DMR) – The Basics

Presented by Jon Andrews, K1IMD

What is this new mode sweeping the VHF & UHF repeater spectrum all over the world?
Oh man… I was listening to a local repeater frequency and there was this horrible buzzy sound on the channel what the heck is that all about?  We will discuss some of the “buzz” and “tech talk” so you will better understand the terminology used in this new mode of operation. Radio is radio but DMR is different than radio operation most hams are used to.  We will discuss primarily the DMR-MARC network and some of the facilities associated with it. 

About Jon Andrews, K1IMD 

 Jon Andrews K1IMD has been a licensed amateur since 1971.  Most of his amateur experience was has been with repeaters and linked repeaters, mobile operation at sea and on land, with a dabbling in HF mobile and fixed station operation.  Jon has operating experience from 160 meters to 2GHz in various modes.  Blending a computer hobby, industrial automation interest and ham radio activities resulted in operating modes other than straight analog or FM such as AX.25 Packet Radio, Fast Scan TV, SSTV, APRS, PSK31, WSPR, VoIP IRLP, Remote station operation via the Internet, HF & VHF/UHF SDR Radio and now most recently Mototrbo ™ or DMR.  From 2001 to 2013 Jon was employed by a Motorola Channel Partner as the senior technician; designing, building and maintaining public safety communications dispatch centers and radio systems for local municipalities, county, state and federal agencies on eastern Long Island, New York.  Jon is presently the CTO at a large HVAC company on Long Island, managing everything that has electrons running around in them.